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Pitlochry Dam Visitor Centre

Pitlochry Dam Visitor Centre is one of the top attractions in the Perthshire area, attracting around 550,000 visitors every year. In 2017 the beautiful dam unveiled an all-new look after the new Pitlochry Dam Visitor Centre opened its doors.

The new visitor centre is definitely something not to be missed if you are visiting the area, as the unusual design is an attraction in itself. The visitor centre is cantilevered eight metres out from the River Tummel’s banks towards Pitlochry Dam Wall. It features unbeatable views over the dam, the hydro station and the River Tummel and hosts a range of exhibitions making it a great day out for all ages.

Pitlochry Dam Visitor Guide
The Pitlochry Dam Visitor Centre is an excellent way to experience the wonders of the dam and the River Tummel, and the centre itself offers excellent features to visitors of Pitlochry dam. There are innovative audio-visual displays teaching visitors about the hydro schemes, fish ladders and various community projects in the local area.

You can sit back and watch a film on the rich history of the dam itself and learn all about the Tunnel Tigers that blasted their way through the dam's rock face.

As well as various interactive demos and activities teaching visitors about the dam and how it works, the Pitlochry Dam Visitor Centre also has a bright and airy cafe where you can grab a bite to eat and drinks from locally sourced suppliers. There is an outdoor seated balcony which offers dramatic views of the dam and Loch Faskally on sunny days.

Pitlochry Dam and Fish Ladder
The popular Pitlochry Dam and fish ladder actually received a lot of local opposition when it was first built in 1946, with the principal reason being that it was built directly over the old Pitlochry Highland Games field. Many locals were worried it would affect tourism in the area, however now the dam and visitor centre are in place, they are a highly popular tourist attraction.

Many visitors are intrigued by the fish ladder at the dam, which was the first of its kind to be built in Scotland. The idea behind it is that the salmon already living in the Pitlochry waterways can easily bypass the dam and continue their journey upstream.